How to be postmodernist

If you want to sound intellectually dazzling, the philosopher Julian Baggini has invented a game called “Žižuku”. The rules are simple: pick on any widely received idea and find the most clever-sounding way to invert it, so as to create a wise-sounding paradox. Baggini gives a few examples:

The more we use psychology to make us feel happier, the more miserable we become.

It is the obsession with healthy eating which is actually making us unhealthy.

Anti-racism is the most racist thing of all , because it, above all else, objectifies race

 If you don’t feel like this game you can always go to the Postmodernism Generator, a computer program that automatically produces imitations of postmodernist writing, especially that of critical theory. Each time you go to this website you get a new randomly generated essay that is completely meaningless. Here is one it produced for me:

 

Capitalist libertarianism, Marxist socialism and rationalism

U. Stefan Porter Department of Gender Politics, University of Illinois

Stephen P. Werther Department of Sociology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

 1. The subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression and textual predialectic theory

The main theme of von Ludwig’s[1] analysis of substructuralist discourse is not theory, as Derrida would have it, but pretheory. A number of dematerialisms concerning the meaninglessness, and eventually the defining characteristic, of cultural class may be revealed. Thus, the subject is contextualised into a textual predialectic theory that includes culture as a totality.

Foucault suggests the use of subtextual feminism to analyse and attack society. Therefore, the premise of capitalist libertarianism suggests that language is capable of significance.

Derrida promotes the use of the subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression to deconstruct the status quo. However, if textual predialectic theory holds, we have to choose between the subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression and cultural situationism.

2. Tarantino and capitalist libertarianism

If one examines textual predialectic theory, one is faced with a choice: either reject neomaterial dialectic theory or conclude that academe is unattainable. In Jackie Brown, Tarantino deconstructs textual predialectic theory; in Four Rooms, however, he examines subcapitalist nihilism. In a sense, Tilton[2] states that we have to choose between capitalist libertarianism and textual desemioticism.

The characteristic theme of the works of Tarantino is not discourse, but prediscourse. The primary theme of Sargeant’s[3] model of conceptualist theory is the rubicon, and subsequent absurdity, of predialectic sexual identity. Therefore, if the subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression holds, the works of Tarantino are reminiscent of Mapplethorpe.

The subject is interpolated into a capitalist capitalism that includes consciousness as a reality. Thus, Debord suggests the use of the subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression to analyse language.

McElwaine[4] implies that we have to choose between capitalist libertarianism and neodeconstructive dialectic theory. But Baudrillard uses the term ‘the subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression’ to denote a mythopoetical paradox.

 The without/within distinction depicted in Stone’s Natural Born Killers emerges again in Platoon, although in a more subconceptual sense. However, if capitalist libertarianism holds, we have to choose between the subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression and dialectic rationalism.

 3. Textual predialectic theory and postcapitalist narrative

In the works of Stone, a predominant concept is the concept of textual sexuality. Lyotard uses the term ‘the subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression’ to denote not deconstruction, but subdeconstruction. Thus, Hamburger[5] suggests that the works of Stone are modernistic.

 “Society is part of the meaninglessness of truth,” says Derrida; however, according to McElwaine[6] , it is not so much society that is part of the meaninglessness of truth, but rather the collapse, and some would say the paradigm, of society. Lyotard uses the term ‘Sartreist existentialism’ to denote the difference between sexual identity and society. Therefore, the characteristic theme of the works of Stone is the role of the participant as observer.

Any number of narratives concerning postcapitalist narrative exist. It could be said that the subject is contextualised into a capitalist libertarianism that includes culture as a totali

 If postcapitalist narrative holds, we have to choose between textual destructuralism and premodern capitalism. Thus, the primary theme of Scuglia’s[7] essay on postcapitalist narrative is the bridge between sexual identity and class.

Derrida uses the term ‘capitalist libertarianism’ to denote not, in fact, theory, but subtheory. But the subject is interpolated into a materialist discourse that includes narrativity as a paradox.

4. Rushdie and postcapitalist narrative

“Sexual identity is meaningless,” says Bataille. Baudrillard promotes the use of Sartreist absurdity to challenge class divisions. It could be said that Lyotard uses the term ‘postcapitalist narrative’ to denote the fatal flaw of posttextual truth.

The subject is contextualised into a capitalist libertarianism that includes language as a totality. But semanticist theory implies that reality comes from the collective unconscious.

Many dematerialisms concerning a self-falsifying paradox may be found. However, the subject is interpolated into a capitalist libertarianism that includes culture as a whole.

An abundance of constructivisms concerning the subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression exist. Therefore, Sontag’s model of postcapitalist narrative suggests that consciousness may be used to reinforce sexism, given that narrativity is equal to truth.

5. Neocultural narrative and dialectic discourse

If one examines capitalist libertarianism, one is faced with a choice: either accept dialectic discourse or conclude that reality is capable of significant form. Bataille uses the term ‘capitalist libertarianism’ to denote the common ground between class and sexual identity. However, the subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression states that truth, surprisingly, has significance.

In the works of Rushdie, a predominant concept is the distinction between masculine and feminine. The main theme of the works of Rushdie is a prestructuralist reality. Therefore, in The Ground Beneath Her Feet, Rushdie reiterates capitalist libertarianism; in The Moor’s Last Sigh he examines the subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression.

 Sontag suggests the use of dialectic nationalism to modify and analyse sexual identity. But the paradigm, and subsequent failure, of the subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression which is a central theme of Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children is also evident in Satanic Verses.

Any number of theories concerning not discourse, as Derrida would have it, but postdiscourse may be revealed. In a sense, Hubbard[8] suggests that we have to choose between Lacanist obscurity and postconceptualist nihilism.

Several theories concerning capitalist libertarianism exist. However, Foucault uses the term ‘dialectic discourse’ to denote the rubicon, and some would say the absurdity, of deconstructive language.

Footnotes

1. von Ludwig, I. K. O. ed. (1994) The Vermillion House: The subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression and capitalist libertarianism. O’Reilly & Associates

 2. Tilton, A. Q. (1978) The subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression in the works of Tarantino. Loompanics

3. Sargeant, E. S. T. ed. (1993) Realities of Stasis: Capitalist libertarianism and the subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression. Schlangekraft

4. McElwaine, K. F. (1979) Capitalist libertarianism in the works of Stone. O’Reilly & Associates

5. Hamburger, G. ed. (1984) The Paradigm of Context: The subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression and capitalist libertarianism. Yale University Press

6. McElwaine, J. D. (1970) Capitalist libertarianism and the subpatriarchialist paradigm of expression. And/Or Press

 7. Scuglia, P. T. A. ed. (1981) The Broken Fruit: Capitalist libertarianism in the works of Rushdie. Panic Button Books

 8. Hubbard, W. (1996) Capitalist libertarianism, rationalism and neocultural textual theory. Oxford University Press

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